St. Luke’s-Mount Sinai Roosevelt
Clinical Psychology Internship Program

Letter to Applicants
Internship Program Setting
Internship Philosophy and Goals
Internship Program Description
Psychology Faculty
Internship Program Conditions, Benefits and Policies
Other Training Opportunities
Application Process
Internship Qualifications


LETTER TO APPLICANTS


Dear Intern Applicant:

Thank you for your interest in the Adult or Child Track of the Clinical Psychology Internship Program at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt. As a result of our most recent APA site visit in 2012, the program received maximal re-accreditation and thus is fully accredited through 2019.*

We look forward to receiving your application.

Sincerely yours,
Susan Tross Ph.D.
Director, Psychology Education and Training
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health
Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt

*American Psychological Association, Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC, 20002-4242, (202) 336-5979.

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INTERNSHIP PROGRAM SETTING

The Clinical Psychology Internship Program at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt is designed to provide interns with a year-long, intensive, clinical experience with diverse patients in a wide range of clinical settings. The Hospital Center is an urban, not-for-profit, voluntary, teaching hospital, of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons – located in Manhattan, on the upper west side (Mount Sinai St. Luke's) and in midtown (Mount Sinai Roosevelt). Together with Mount Sinai Beth Israel and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, St. Luke's Roosevelt is part of the Mount Sinai Health System The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary system, which includes two emergency rooms (with Comprehensive Psychiatry Emergency Programs), two adult inpatient units, two outpatient clinics (child and adult), a therapeutic school and milieu for adolescents, a parent-infant intervention program, community outreach services, intensive outpatient treatment programs, specialty psychiatric clinics, a full continuum of care substance abuse facility, a dedicated clinical research unit, and a consultation-liaison psychiatry service (throughout the hospital center). There are more than thirty staff psychologists who participate in the Internship Program, as supervisors, administrators, clinicians, teachers and researchers. Many staff psychologists also have academic appointments in the Department of Psychiatry, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. In addition, the Director of Psychiatry Residency Training and the Director of Child Psychiatry Training and core Psychiatry Residency Training faculty, especially those who direct clinical services, participate in the Internship Program. Adjunct psychology faculty also teaches and supervises in the Internship Program

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INTERNSHIP PHILOSOPHY AND GOALS

The Internship Program offers broad-based, generalist training in clinical psychology as practiced in a modern, urban hospital center. The Internship has two overarching goals: (1) Development of each intern’s professional judgment, proficiency, and identity, through experience with   a wide variety of patients and treatment settings; and (2) Development of each intern's ability to be an independent, skilled, conceptually-based, and empathic clinician – with a keen sense of the role of ethnic, cultural and contextual factors in individuals’ lives. Training in various diagnoses and modalities of evidence-based psychotherapy and assessment is integral to this process. An integrative treatment approach – combining psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, systems, ethnocultural, developmental and medical model perspectives -- is emphasized. This approach is taught, and practiced by psychology interns, throughout the various clinical placements and didactics. Within this approach, an attempt is made to individually tailor each intern’s experience in accordance with his/her interests and goals.  Ongoing program planning and evaluation involving the interns and their supervisors are an integral part of the program. Interns are encouraged to assume a gradually increasing degree of professional responsibility and autonomy as the year progresses.

The Internship Program is guided by the tenets of the practitioner-scholar model. Our primary focus is on developing the intern’s capacities to deliver clinical psychological services. This is implemented through supervised clinical experience and courses. Empirical and theoretical psychological literature is the core of our experiential and didactic training. Thus, we emphasize evidence-based intervention and assessment, empirically-validated psychological theory, and methods of scientific inquiry and analysis in our training and services. As Rodolfa et al. (2005) (Rodolfa, E. et al., 2005, Internship training: Do models really matter? Professional Psychology, Research and Practice, 36(1), 25-31) observe: the practitioner-scholar model ‘emphasizes the development of reflective skills and multiple ways of knowing in the practice of psychology, and it stresses clinical practice and the importance of theory and the use of research to inform practice’.

In facilitating interns’ proficiency to function as independent, generalist psychologists, the Internship Program is dedicated to developing certain core competencies. These are competencies in: (1) Evaluation skills (including history taking, mental status examination, assessment of self-harm and harm to others, assessment of substance abuse problems, psychodiagnostic testing, DSM multiaxial diagnosis, treatment planning, communication with patients about diagnosis and treatment plan); (2) Psychotherapy skills (including development and maintenance of therapeutic alliance, establishment of therapeutic frame, and establishment of treatment goals, as well as skills specific to psychodynamic psychotherapy, evidence-based behavioral psychotherapies (especially CBT and DBT), group therapy, and family therapy); (3) Awareness of the role of ethnic, cultural, sexual and other identities in psychological adaptation, and ability to apply this awareness in the delivery of clinical services; (4) Awareness of ethical guidelines for clinical practice, and ability to apply this awareness in the delivery of clinical services; (5) Consultation skills (in collaboration with other service providers within hospital psychiatry services, as well as from other hospital services, social service and other community agencies, and schools (for the Child Track only); and (5) Facility in using scientific theory, inquiry, and analysis, research findings, and evidence-based interventions, to guide clinical practice in psychology.    

 

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INTERNSHIP PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Internship is a two-track (i.e. Child and Adult Track) Program, housed in the Psychology Education and Training Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. At the time of application, each intern applies to either the Adult or Child Track. There are six Adult Track and six Child track interns. Both tracks are anchored in the Program’s core commitment to integrationist philosophy, evidence-based evaluation and intervention, and ethnocultural competence. Both tracks offer training in intervention and assessment. Both tracks embrace a highly participatory teaching style  – in shared and separate core courses. Both tracks are staffed by some common and some distinct Faculty. Both Tracks place interns in clinical services for periods generally between four months and one year. Within each clinical rotation, interns have an opportunity to develop their skills in various forms of evaluation and treatment. This allows them to gain clinical experience with patients from different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds with a wide range of psychopathology, as well as to learn about treatment systems by becoming an integral member of a treatment team. With one exception (i.e. Comprehensive Adolescent Rehabilitation and Education Service, or CARES), the two Tracks use different clinical rotations -- to provide relevant clinical experience with their respective populations.

ROTATIONS

ADULT TRACK

The Adult Track internship year consists of three major (generally four-month) clinical rotations, as well as a (below described) year-long clinical experience in the Adult Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic, and a (below described) four-month assessment experience.  It should be noted that, in order to facilitate a positive therapeutic relationship with CARES adolescents, at the start of the school year, it is sometimes necessary to lengthen the CARES rotation to six months, and to shorten the inpatient rotation to two months, for the intern rotating to CARES at this time of year.

All Adult Track interns participate in:

1.) Inpatient Rotation: Interns are assigned to one of two thirty-six bed inpatient units where they function as primary clinicians for their patients. Their responsibilities include intake evaluation, individual and group psychotherapy, psychodiagnostic assessment, and participation as a team member in staff and unit community activities. Interns carry two individual inpatients, and co-lead one therapy group. On-site supervision is provided by psychiatrist unit chiefs, and supervising psychologists (i.e. on one unit, an inpatient staff psychologist, on the other unit, a psychologist for inpatient individual therapy and a psychologist for inpatient group therapy).

2.) In addition to these Rotations, each intern chooses two elective rotations from among the following:

A.) Comprehensive Adolescent Rehabilitation and Education Service (CARES) is a therapeutic school and milieu for sixty dually and singly diagnosed high school students. Here interns carry one individual treatment case, co-lead two groups and serve as milieu therapists.  Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Transtheoretical Stage of Change model and Harm Reduction strategies for substance abuse and dependence are the primary treatment approaches. Treatment is delivered in individual psychotherapy, group therapy, family therapy, and various milieu activities (e.g. community meetings). Interns also conduct intakes and psychodiagnostic assessment. Interns carry one individual patient, and co-lead two therapy groups. The psychologist program director and staff psychologists provide supervision.

B.) Psychiatric Recovery Center (PRC) is an intensive outpatient program offering services designed to meet the needs of individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. A work and recovery model informs the treatment, and supports the goal of engagement in vocational, pre-vocational, or educational activity, either on-site or outside of the program. Psychology interns are an integral part of PRC's multidisciplinary team. Interns serve as primary therapists, conducting individual psychotherapy with four patients, leading several groups, and conducting intakes. Interns may also conduct psychodiagnostic assessment to help clarify diagnosis and level of functioning. The psychologist director as well as other psychologists on staff provide supervision.

C.) The Center for Intensive Treatment of Personality Disorders (CITPD) is an intensive outpatient treatment program for adults who are in acute crisis. The majority of patients have affective illness and/or axis II pathology. Treatment takes the form of various group and individual sessions aimed at helping patients resolve the acute crisis and make the transition back into the community. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a treatment focus as well as psychodynamic and process work. Interns carry two individual patients, co-lead several groups, and conduct intakes. The psychologist director, as well as other psychologists and professionals on staff, provide supervision.

D.) The Addiction Institute of New York (AI) is a comprehensive substance abuse treatment center – which includes detoxification, intensive inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, outpatient treatment programs, residential treatment, methadone, buprenorphine and other pharmacologic treatment, and a consultation service for medical/surgical inpatient units. The intern may be placed into specialty clinics of the outpatient treatment program (e.g. ‘Crystal Clear’ relapse prevention program for stimulant-using men who have sex with men, young adult program for individuals with various types of substance use, DBT-informed groups for dually diagnosed individuals with Axis II disorders, etc.) and/or in the intensive outpatient rehabilitation service. Interns co-lead several groups and provide as-needed individual counseling to group members. Interns may also participate in consultations with the medical/surgical services. The psychologist Assistant Director, Outpatient Treatment Programs, as well as other psychologists and professionals on staff, provide supervision.
  

CHILD TRACK

The Child Track internship year consists of a year-long placement in CARES and one (of two) year-long electives, as well as a year-long clinical experience in the Child Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic.

All child interns participate in:
 
1.) The Comprehensive Adolescent Rehabilitation and Education Service (CARES) – a therapeutic high school and milieu described above. Throughout the Internship year, Child Track interns carry one individual treatment case, co-lead two groups and serve as milieu therapists. The psychologist program director and staff psychologists provide supervision.

2.) In addition to these, each intern chooses one other year-long elective from among the following sub-specialty clinics:

A.) The Parent Infant Center (PIC) is a service for pregnant women, caregivers and babies, ages zero to three, which provides individual, group and dyadic treatment   focusing on building healthy attachment relationships. The Parent-Infant Center (PIC) rotation focuses on teaching interns about infant assessment using empirically validated instruments such as the Bayley Scales. Interns also conduct Parent-Infant Intakes with patients ages zero-5 and their caregivers. The psychologist program director and staff psychologists provide supervision.
 
B.) The Testing and Assessment Service (TAS) offers neuropsychological evaluations for patients who may have learning disabilities and/or require a clarification of diagnosis. On this rotation, interns learn how to administer, score, interpret and comprehensively report and present the results of neuropsychological batteries. Interns administer approximately eight or more batteries during their rotation. The neuropsychologist service director and staff neuropsychologists provide supervision.

PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT MINI-ROTATION

For interns in both Tracks, we offer an optional mini-rotation in the Psychiatric Emergency Department. One evening per week, for one – two months, interns can join the Psychiatric Emergency Department team. They receive on-the-job training in crisis assessment, diagnostic interviewing, and treatment planning, with acute and sub-acute adults, adolescents and children. Interested interns can participate in this mini-rotation only if the Training Director or Associate Training Directors and the Director of the Psychiatric Emergency Department agree that he/she has sufficient time to do so.

OUTPATIENT PSYCHIATRY CLINIC EXPERIENCE

In both Tracks, outpatient individual, group and family therapy is a major, year-long, component of Internship clinical experience.

ADULT TRACK

In the Adult Outpatient Clinic, each intern carries a caseload of: one group (co-led with another intern), one family, and five – six individual patients, with a broad range of psychiatric diagnoses, demographic characteristics, and ethnic, cultural and sexual identities, and life situations. Interns receive supervision in each of the following areas: group psychotherapy (one hour/week, shared by the intern co-leaders); individual (psychodynamic therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, supportive therapy) case management, and crisis intervention (two hours/week, delivered by two supervisors); individual cognitive behavioral therapy (one hour/week, within a small group of interns); and family therapy (two hours/week, delivered in real-time, using a one-way mirror, and shared by the intern class, serving as consultants). Interns are also trained to conduct intake evaluations and treatment screenings.

CHILD TRACK

In the Child Outpatient Clinic, each intern carries a caseload of: one group (co-led with another intern), one or more families, two parent-infant dyads, and approximately eight individual patients, with a broad range of psychiatric and developmental problems, ages, demographic characteristics, ethnic, cultural and sexual identities, and life situations. The target population is children, ages zero to eighteen, and their families. Interns receive individual supervision in each of the following areas: group psychotherapy (one hour/week); individual (psychodynamic therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, supportive therapy) case management, and crisis intervention (two hours/week, delivered by two supervisors); parent-infant treatment (one hour per week in a small group); and family therapy (one hour per week in a small group, sometimes using real-time, one-way mirror-assisted feedback).

ASSESSMENT

In both Tracks, assessment is an important component of the Internship clinical experience. In the Adult Track, each intern will administer, score, interpret, and compose a report at least three comprehensive assessments. These assessments will make use of cognitive tests (i.e. WAIS-IV), objective personality tests (e.g. MMPI, MCMI, etc.), projective personality tests (e.g. Rorschach), structured psychiatric interviews (e.g. SCID), symptom rating scales, and neuropsychological screening tests, as needed. Interns receive intensive supervision on administration, interpretation, and report-writing (i.e. approximately six hours/ assessment). As described above, in the Child Track, interns who choose the TAS rotation, interns administer, score, interpret, report on, and present approximately eight assessments, over their year-long placement. Interns receive intensive supervision for these activities (i.e. approximately six hours/assessment).

CONSULTATION

On all of the Rotations, as well as in the Adult and Child Outpatient Psychiatric Clinics, consultation is an aspect of the interns’ clinical experience. In the process of implementing treatment plans, coordinating services for patients with complex problems, interns routinely consult with (psychiatric, social service, case management, medical and other) providers from community-based social service agencies, foster care agencies, hospitals, schools, universities, criminal justice agencies, and other facilities. The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health Consultation-Liaison Services, for adults and children, are potential sites for interns to participate in consultation, as part of a team (with attending psychiatrists and psychiatry residents). Due to the already full-time workload of the interns, interns don’t currently rotate into this service. However, optional opportunities, to join the Consultation-Liaison teams for a mini-rotation, are available -- should the intern and the Training Director or Associate Training Directors and the Directors of the adult and/or child Consultation-Liaison Services agree that he/she has sufficient time to do so. 

RESEARCH

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health has a full-time Director of Research who is a clinical health psychologist and a core member of the Internship Program Faculty. The research program has facilities in both hospitals, but is primarily housed in the Behavioral Science Research Unit (BSRU) that occupies nearly a full floor of Mount Sinai St. Luke's. The BSRU is the home of an active complement of psychological and psychiatric investigators, engaged in clinical research. These typically include: trials of behavioral and/or pharmacologic approaches to substance use and other psychiatric disorders; and trials of novel behavioral therapies for adults and children with a broad range of mental and physical health problems. Currently, there are 8 Psychology Faculty with (federal or foundation) grant-funded research. Due to the already full-time workload of the interns, interns don’t currently rotate into research projects. However, evidence-based intervention and assessment, empirically-validated psychological theory, and methods of scientific inquiry and analysis are central components of our supervision, didactics and services. As interns are frequently in the process of completing dissertations, attention is devoted to discussion of interns’ dissertation research, to on-site resources (e.g. SPSS-equipped computers, library, etc.), and to strategies for solving dissertation issues. Interns who have completed dissertations may be interested in optional participation in research. Interns are encouraged to use Faculty as mentors, in completing their research, or in exploring limited participation in research – should the intern and the Training Director or Associate Training Directors and the Research Director agree that he/she has sufficient time to do so. 

SUPERVISION

Supervision is focused on helping the interns deepen and broaden their understanding of clinical processes and the treatment situation. A special effort is made to facilitate development of a flexible stance to respond to the needs of a culturally, ethnically, and medically diverse patient population. Supervisors in the Child and Adult Tracks are committed to providing supportive instruction that encourages the development of clinical technique and the integration of theory and scientific evidence into therapeutic practice. An integrative treatment approach – combining psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, dialectical behavioral, family-systems, ethnocultural, developmental, medical model, and other perspectives -- is emphasized. Supervision uses audio or video recording, one-way mirror observation and consultation (i.e. for family therapy), or, if the patient(s) decline(s), process notes. Supervisors may also join sessions, as part of supervision. 

As described above, interns receive close, regular supervision during all of their rotations and clinical experiences. In their outpatient psychiatry clinic experience, they receive a minimum of six hours of individual, group and family supervision. In their rotations, in various forms, supervision is an integral part of their daily activities. This includes: individual supervision (for individual patients); supervision of intern co-leaders (for groups); co-leadership, with Faculty, of groups; and group supervision with other interns, fellows and externs. Interns also participate in clinical team meetings, staff meetings, and case conferences, throughout the week. In their assessment experience, interns receive several hours of supervision, for administration, scoring, interpretation, and report-writing. All supervisors are also available, on an as-needed basis, for additional meetings or phone consultations. Interns are especially urged to contact their supervisors for emergencies.

On both Tracks, Interns meet individually with the Training Director or Associate Training Directors, for overall program supervision, career guidance, evaluative feedback, and elicitation of their feedback about their Internship experience, three times per year. This occurs: early in the year; mid-year; and end of year. The Training Director and Associate Directors also conduct regular sessions, on a monthly basis, focused on interns’ ongoing experience of their clinical experience, rotations, supervision, didactics, and systems experience of the Services they are part of, and of the overall Internship Program. These sessions are aimed at identifying Program strengths and weaknesses, and making appropriate real-time adjustments. The Training Director and Associate Directors are also available, on an as-needed basis, for additional meetings or phone consultations. Interns are especially urged to contact them for emergencies.

Education in models of supervision is the focus of a Course Module in the Combined Child-Adult Track Core Curriculum. Depending on the intern’s level of experience and workload, he/she may have the opportunity to provide supervision to externs working on a Service with them. This is determined by the Training Director, Associate Directors and Rotation Director.

DIDACTICS

The Internship didactics program consists of a few main components. These include:

A. Year-long Combined Child and Adult Track Core Courses:

1.Once weekly (one-hour) Core courses, that address the central psychological proficiencies of the Internship Program-- in areas such as Ethics, Emergency Intervention, experiential approaches to Multicultural Diversity Awareness, Supervision, Termination and others -- are conducted with Child and Adult Track interns. This also includes regular sessions, focused on interns’ ongoing experience of their clinical experience, rotations, supervision, didactics, and systems experience – for the purpose of making real-time Program adjustments;

2. Monthly (one-hour) Psychology Professional Development lunches, that present key topics, such as adaptation to Internship, choosing and pursuing research and clinical fellowships, completing dissertation, choosing and pursuing job opportunities, and others -- are conducted with Child and Adult interns;

B. Year-long Adult Track-specific and Child Track-specific Core Courses:

1. In the Adult Track, these consist of:

1a. Twice weekly (50-minute) Core courses in evidence-based assessment and intervention -- in areas such as DSM-IV diagnosis, psychological assessment, ethnoculturally-informed formulation and intervention, CBT, DBT, group therapy, MI, psychoanalytically-oriented therapy, and other topics. Courses are generally organized into four to six week modules -- and conducted yearlong. However, Courses in Ethnoculturally-informed Formulation and Intervention, and Psychological Assessment are, respectively, delivered as series of once-monthly sessions. This also includes monthly sessions, focused on interns’ ongoing experience of their clinical experience, rotations, supervision, didactics, and systems experience of the Services they are part of – for the purpose of making real-time Program adjustments.
 
1b. Once-weekly (two-hour) one-way-mirror-assisted and videotape-assisted Family Therapy supervision -- conducted yearlong;

1c. Once-weekly (one-and-one-half hour) audiorecording-assisted intensive psychotherapy case presentation (using an integrationist approach) -- conducted for six months;

1d. Once-weekly (one hour) psychopharmacology course -- conducted for six months;

1e. One-week, daily summer Orientation Course – providing a basic overview of: Internship philosophy, policies and procedures; outpatient psychiatric clinic experience; rotations; supervision; TIER electronic medical record and other clinical documentation procedures; emergency policies and procedures; safety policies and procedures; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health policies and procedures; hospital policies, procedures and benefits; introduction to DSM-IV diagnosis, evidence-based interventions, psychopharmacology, hospital-based psychiatry, and other key topics;

2. In the Child Track, these consist of:

2a. Once weekly (one hour) core course on evidence-based treatments for the major presenting problems of child and adolescent patients including internalizing and externalizing behaviors, anxiety and developmental trauma disorders, and substance abuse disorders. Topics include CBT, DBT, MI, psychodynamically-oriented therapy, and creative arts therapies.  Modules run for four to six weeks, and also cover theories and interventions of group therapy, family therapy and parent-infant treatment.

2b. Once weekly (one hour) course on neuropsychology and testing related to the assessment of children and adolescents with possible learning and developmental disabilities.

2c. Weekly day-long “summer course” for six weeks covering topics such as psychopharmacology, DBT, diagnostic interviewing, Attachment, Self-Regulation and Competency treatment (ARC); Motivational Interviewing (MI) and the Webster-Stratton Incredible Years program for parent training.

2d. Once monthly (one hour) case conference focusing on issues of diversity and culture in the treatment situation.

C. Once-weekly, year-long Psychiatry Grand Rounds – featuring expert researchers and clinicians, and state-of-the-art research findings and clinical material in psychiatry, psychology and other mental health disciplines.

PROCESS GROUP

Adult and Child Track interns, respectively, take part in once-weekly process groups that focus on issues related to their training experience and professional development.

EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK

Evaluation and feedback is an integral part of the conduct of the Internship Program. Throughout the Internship year, evaluation and feedback, on a variety of levels, provides the basis for real-time self-appraisal and (as-needed) enhancement of all aspects of the Internship Program, as well as of intern work. Three times/year (i.e. early in the year, mid-year, end of year), evaluations are obtained from interns and ongoing supervisors. At end of rotations, evaluations are obtained from interns and Rotation supervisors. At end of Course modules, evaluations are obtained from interns, as a group.

Information about supervision and courses, shared with the Training Director or Associate Training Directors, is used to identify Program strengths and weaknesses, and to make real-time adjustments. Information about Intern work, shared in supervision as well as in individual meetings with the Training Director or Associate Training Directors, is used to support and enhance the intern’s ongoing experience and proficiency. Interns meet individually with the Training Director or Associate Training Directors, for overall program supervision, career guidance, evaluative feedback, and elicitation of their feedback about their Internship experience, three times per year. The Training Director and Associate Directors also conduct regular sessions, on a monthly basis, focused on interns’ ongoing experience of their clinical experience, rotations, supervision, didactics, and systems experience of the Services they are part of, and of the overall Internship Program.



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PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY

The large critical mass of (especially psychologist) staff working in the Internship Program demonstrates its vital and integral role in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Over thirty staff psychologists contribute to the Internship Program – as supervisors, teachers, administrators, clinicians, or researchers. In addition, another thirteen adjunct faculty psychologists participate as supervisors or teachers. Further, the Director of  Psychiatry Residency Training and the Director of Child Psychiatry Fellowship Training, and other core Psychiatry staff, especially those who direct clinical services, are active participants in the Internship Program.

Below are a list of the Psychology Internship Faculty, including name, title, site of Internship Program involvement, degree, school, and year of graduation, and interests:

Anne Bohraus, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: New School University, 2006. Interests: Integrative psychodynamic psychotherapy; couples psychotherapy.

Christopher Branson, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute. Degree: University of Virginia, 2007. Interests: Adolescent substance abuse and HIV risk behavior; prevention/intervention with high risk youth; engagement intervention; mobile health technologies; program evaluation.

Donald Brown, M.D., Attending Psychiatrist, Psychiatric Recovery Center. Degree: Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 1965. Interests: Family therapy (Certification).

Alba Cabral, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist. The Child and Family Institute Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Degree: City University of New York, 2009. Interests: Trauma, Psychological Testing, Family Therapy.

Nadine Chang, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, Adult Inpatient Psychiatry. Degree: Hofstra University, 2007. Interests: Inpatient Psychotherapy; CBT for Psychosis.

Barbara R. Cohn, Ph.D., ABPP, Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Associate Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: New York University, 1974. Interests: Group psychotherapy, systems theory.

Claudia Diez, Ph.D., ABPP, Supervising Psychologist , Psychiatric Recovery Center. Degree: New School University, 2008. Interests: Personality assessment, integrative psychodynamic psychotherapy.

Tia Dole, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist, Psychiatric Recovery Center, PEER Program. Degree: Fordham University, 2001. Interests: Treatment of Early Psychosis, Trauma, Personality Disorders, DBT.

Georgia Gaveras, D.O., Director, Training and Education in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Degree: University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2003. Interests: Adolescents, Eating Disorders, Addictions.

Kimberly Hall, Ph.D. Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: New School University, 2003. Interests: Psychodynamic psychotherapy.

Deborah Haller, Ph.D. ABPP, Director of Psychiatric/Psychological Research, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt. Professor of Clinical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: University of Alabama, 1980. Interests: Health psychology; addictions; dynamic psychotherapy; Motivational Interviewing.

Yuko Hanakawa, Ph.D. Supervising Psychologist, Psychiatric Recovery Center. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree:  Adelphi University, 2005. Interests: Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy.

Leora R. Heckelman, Ph.D., Associate Director Adult Track. Assistant Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Harvard University, 1992. Interests: Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety Disorders (Certification).

Avytal R. Izaak, Psy.D. Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2001. Interests: Depression; anxiety; severe mental illness.

Wendie Klapper, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, Director of the Parent Infant Center, The Child and Family Institute. Instructor in Clinical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Hofstra University, 1990. Interests: Parent-infant/dyadic treatment; attachment theory; teen pregnancy; public health; trauma

Melinda Koenig, Psy.D, Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 1990. Interests: Integrative psychodynamic psychotherapy; Disaster management.

Robin Kerner, Ph.D. Director, Quality Initiatives and Outcomes, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: City University of New York, 1998. Interests: Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (Certification).

Rahael Kurrien, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute, Parent-Infant Center. Degree: Clark University, 2008.  Interests: Parent- infant psychotherapy; cross-cultural psychology; risk and resiliency models of treatment.

Gary Lefer, M.D. Director, Acute Hospital Services, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Columbia University. Degree: Georgetown University School of Medicine, 1966. Interests: Psychoanalysis (Certification); Inpatient Psychiatry; Emergency Psychiatry.

Lisa Litt, Ph.D., Clinical Director, Trauma Related Programs. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Adelphi University, 1996. Interests: Combined treatment of PTSD and substance use disorders.

Ingrid Luchsinger, Psy.D., Supervising Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute Parent-Infant Center. Degree: Yeshiva University, 2008. Interests: Parent-infant psychotherapy; underserved populations; psychodynamic psychotherapy.

Miriam Martinez, Ph.D. Chief, Clinical Strategic Initiatives. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Columbia University. Degree: University of California, Berkeley, 1980. Interests: Health disparities in women and minorities; child and adolescent trauma; multidisciplinary care and care integration; multicultural clinical training.

Jon McCormick, Ph.D. Process Group Leader, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Adjunct Instructor in Clinical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Adelphi University, 1984. Interests: Group psychotherapy; psychodynamic psychotherapy (Certification).

Elizabeth Merrill, Psy.D., Associate Director, Child Track, Psychology Education and Training, The Child and Family Institute, Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Degree: The Wright Institute, 2007. Interests: Group psychotherapy; psychoanalysis.

Howard Millman, M.D., Attending Psychiatrist, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Degree: New York University School of Medicine, 1969. Interests: Psychoanalysis (Certification).

Preetika Mukherjee, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic, Testing and Assessment Service. Degree: New York University, 2009. Interests: Pediatric neuropsychological evaluation, child and adolescent development, and individual (particularly adolescent) and family therapy.

Susan E. Palmgren Ph.D., Director, Psychiatric Recovery Center. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: New School University, 2006. Interests: Integrative psychotherapeutic treatment of severe mental illness.

Paul Rinaldi, Ph.D. Clinical Director, Addiction Institute of New York. Degree: Fordham University, 1995. Interests: Addictions; evidence-based interventions.

Santiago Rivera-Santos, Ph.D. Staff Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Interests: Family therapy; Parenting; Trauma. Degree: Carlos Albuiz University, 2008.

Michael Roberts, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, Adult Inpatient Psychiatry. Degree: New School for Social Research. 1983. Interests: Psychoanalysis (Certification).

Genevieve Rosenbaum, Ph.D., Director of Child and Adolescent Psychology Education, The Child and Family Institute. Degree; New York Univesity, 2001. InterestsL Mood Disorders, community psychology, parenting, psychoanalytic theory, supervision.

Morris Roy, Ph.D. Supervising Psychologist, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: Adelphi University, 2001. Interests: Dialectical Behavior Therapy; LGBT psychotherapy; psychodynamic psychotherapy.

Joseph Ruggiero, Ph.D. Assistant Clinical Director, Outpatient Programs, Addiction Institute of New York. Degree: Fordham University, 1995. Interests: Addictions, LGBT psychotherapy.

Dana Scherr Parchi, Psy.D., Supervising Psychologist, The Child and Family Institute Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Degree: Yeshiva University, 2007. Interests: Individual and family therapy; psychology of personality.

Prameet Singh, M.D. Director, Education and Training, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Degree: University of Delhi, 1990. Interests: Addiction psychiatry.

Shilpa Taufique, Ph.D., Clinical Director, Comprehensive Adolescent Rehabilitation and Education Services (CARES), The Child and Family Institute. Degree: New York University, 2004. Interests: Diversity issues; adolescents; group dynamics; systems theories; program development and evaluation; substance abuse and co-occurring disorders; group therapy.

Amy Taylor, C.S.W., Staff Social Worker, Psychiatric Recovery Center. Degree: Columbia University School of Social Work, 1973. Interests: Family Therapy. (Certification).

Susan Tross, Ph.D.  Director of Psychology Education and Training. Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: Yeshiva University, 1983. Interests: Addictions; HIV/STD prevention interventions; Motivational Interviewing; relapse prevention; evidence-based interventions; community-based intervention research in addictions and HIV/STD prevention.

Andrew Twardon, Ph.D. Director, Center for Intensive Treatment of Personality. Clinical Associate, New School University. Degree: New School University, 1993. Interests: Assessment, diagnosis and psychotherapy of personality disorders; application of Buddhist meditation in psychotherapy; self and language.

Lucia Vail, Ph.D., Supervising Psychologist, Center for Intensive Treatment of Personality Disorders. Degree: Long Island University, 2003. Interests: Interests: Personality disorders; Dialectical Behavior Therapy.

SUPLEMENTARY PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY

Robert Bartlett, Ph.D., Supervisor, The Child and Family Institute Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic. Degree: Teachers College, Columbia University, 1999. Interests: Neuropsychological testing, psychoanalysis.

Philip Clemmey, Supervisor, The Child and Family Institute. Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: California School of Professional Psycology (San Diego, CA), 1993. Interests: Adolscent substance abuse; HIV prevention interventions, cognitive behavioral treatments, applied clinical research.

Adam Fried, Ph.D. Teacher, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Degree: Fordham University, 2007. Interests: Ethics in psychological practice and research.

Howard Friedman, Ph.D. Teacher, The Child and Family Institute. Degree: New York University, 1991. Interests: Group Therapy, Organizational Development.

Katherine Gomperts, Psy.D. Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 2003. Interests: Integrative psychodynamic psychotherapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy.

Sarah Gundle, Psy.D. Supervisor, Adult Outpatient Clinic. Degree: Wright Institute, 2004. Interests: Combined treatment of PTSD and substance use disorders; Immigration.

Anton Hart, Ph.D. Teacher, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1989. Interests: Relational psychoanalysis.

Judith J. Lillie, Psy.D, Adjunct Supervising Psychologist OPD, The Child and Family Institute, Instructor in Clinical Psychology, Yeshiva University, 1998. Interests: Psychoanalytic psychotherapy; trauma; play therapy; couples therapy.

Karen Singleton, Ph.D., Teacher, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Degree: City University of New York Graduate Center, 2004. Interests: Multicultural awareness education and training; Treatment of sexual violence.

Seyjal Vyas, Ph.D., Supervisor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Columbia University. Degree: University of California, Fresno, 2002. Interests: Neuropsychology.

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INTERNSHIP PROGRAM CONDITIONS, BENEFITS AND POLOCIES

The Internship begins on July 1st and ends on June 30th. Interns are expected to work at least forty hours per week, including two evenings in the Adult Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic (Adult Track) and three evenings in the Child Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic (Child Track). The full-time stipend is $30,000 in addition to medical insurance benefits and four weeks-paid vacation. Twelve sick, four personal, and two conferences days are also available to interns.

St. Luke's Roosevelt is an equal opportunity employer. In accord with New York City, New York State and U.S. Government law, discrimination on the basis of age, gender, race/ethnicity, veteran status, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation or pregnancy, is forbidden.

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OTHER TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

The Psychology Education and Training Division also offers supervised clinical opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellowship. Typically, there are 12 Post-Doctoral Fellows. These include 6 Post-Doctoral Fellows in the Adult Track, and 6 Post-Doctoral Fellows in the Child Track. In the Adult Track, there are Fellowships in the: Addiction Institute Of New York; Women’s Health Project; Center For Intensive Treatment Of Personality Disorders; Psychiatric Recovery Center; and the Adult Outpatient Clinic. Depending on grant funding, there may also be Fellowships in the Behavioral Science Research Unit. Please contact the Director, Psychology Education and Training, to learn more about these.

The Division also offers supervised clinical opportunities for Pre-Doctoral Externship in both the Child Track and the Adult Track. In the Adult Track, there are Externships in: Addiction Institute of New York; Women’s Health Project; Center For Intensive Treatment Of Personality Disorders; Psychiatric Recovery Center; and Behavioral Science Research Unit. Please contact the Director, Psychology Education and Training, to learn more about these opportunities.

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APPLICATION PROCESS

St. Luke's Roosevelt participates in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers’ (APPIC) Matching Program, using the National Matching Services, Inc. (NMS). We thus ask that applicants follow the AAPI Online application process described in the AAPI (Application for Psychology Internship) Online section of the APPIC website (www.appic.org), and the procedures described for psychology internship programs on the NMS website (www.natmatch.com/psychint). The NMS Program Match Code for the Adult Track is 147912; the NMS Program Match Code for the Child Track is 147913.

The first step is providing the following materials, via AAPI Online, by November 12:

* Application

* Cover letter (including your statement of interest in either the Adult or Child Track of our Internship Program)

* Two letters of recommendation (including teachers or supervisors who
are familiar with your graduate work, and at least one, with your
clinical skill)

* Graduate school transcript

* Recent psychodiagnostic report

Please note that, following APPIC website AAPI Online instructions, the psychodiagnostic report, which is not part of the regular AAPI Online application, must be converted into an electronic document (e.g. via scanning), uploaded to the AAPI Online service, and attached to the application as a 'supplementary material'.

The second step is interviewing and visiting our Internship Program site. Because of the large number of applications, we can only invite a subgroup of applicants for interview. We will contact you by December 15 – either to invite you to interview, or to inform you that we are not inviting you for interview.

The Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt Psychology Internship Program abides by all APPIC rules governing the application and selection process. Under these rules, once a candidate's application is under consideration, very little information about the status of the applicant may be released

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INTERNSHIP QUALIFICATIONS

The following are qualifications for the Internship Program:

• Being a doctoral student in an APA-accredited Ph.D. or Psy.D. doctoral program in clinical, counseling or combined clinical-school psychology (both Adult and Child Tracks) or school psychology (Child Track)

• Having completed at least three years of doctoral study in such a program

• Having completed at least two years of supervised practicum/externship clinical experience with ethnoculturally diverse, poor, urban populations, comparable to those served by our hospital center (e.g. people with severe and persistent mental illness (Adult Track) , people with personality disorders (Adult Track), latency age and adolescent youth (Child Track), and others)

• Having worked in diverse clinical settings, comparable to those of our Internship (e.g. intensive outpatient treatment programs (both Adult and Child Tracks), inpatient units (Adult Track), community or hospital outpatient psychiatric clinics (both Adult and Child Tracks), foster care or social service agencies (Child Track), schools (child Track), and others)

• Having conducted individual and group therapy (both Adult and Child Tracks) 

• Having administered, scored, interpreted and written reports on at least two comprehensive psychodiagnostic assessments

If you have questions regarding your application, please contact:

Susan Tross, Ph.D., Director of Psychology Education
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health
Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt
1090 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10025
stross@chpnet.org

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