Kidney and Intestinal Artery Disease Kidney Artery

What is kidney and intestinal (mesenteric) artery disease?
Plaque, a wax-like material made up largely of cholesterol and calcium, can accumulate on the inside walls of arteries. The build-up narrows the arteries, decreasing blood flow through these vessels. When narrowing occurs in the arteries supplying blood to the intestines or kidneys, less blood carrying oxygen and nutrients reaches those organs.

What are the risk factors for kidney and intestinal artery disease?
These include a family history of hardening of the arteries (artherosclerosis), high blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes, high cholesterol, and advanced age.

Kidney (renal) artery disease can also be caused by Fibromuscular Dysplasia, a genetic defect, which involves overgrown tissue within the artery that blocks blood flow.

What are the symptoms of kidney and intestinal artery disease?
Narrowing of the kidney (renal) arteries can cause persistent high blood pressure. It can also cause kidney failure.

Narrowing of the intestinal (mesenteric) arteries can lead to unexplained weight loss and extreme abdominal pain when eating due to lack of blood flow, which is called intestinal ischemia. It can even lead to gangrene (tissue death).

How is kidney and intestinal artery disease diagnosed?
One or more of these imaging tests is used to discover the location and degree of narrowing in the artery: duplex ultrasound; angiography; magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CT scan.

What are the treatment options for kidney and intestinal artery disease?

MINIMALLY INVASIVE TECHNIQUES

  • Balloon Angioplasty and Stenting: A tiny balloon guided into the blocked artery inflates, pushing plaque against the walls and increasing blood flow. A metal tube (stent) remains in the vessel and keeps it wide open.

OPEN SURGERY

  • Arterial Bypass Surgery: Blood is redirected through a grafted blood vessel to bypass the blood vessel that is damaged. A graft may be a healthy natural vein or artery, or it may be man-made.

For more information or to make an appointment with a vascular surgeon at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, click here to fill out an appointment scheduling form. A staff member will get back to you within 48 hours to schedule an appointment.

For An Appointment Call

Thomas R. Bernik, MD
Endovascular and Vascular Surgery
212.844.5555

Robert J. Grossi, MD
Vascular Surgery
212.844.5559

Gary A. Gwertzman, MD
Vascular Surgery and Wound Care
718.677.0109

Stephen P. Haveson, MD
Vascular Surgery and Wound Care
212.844.1330

Jennifer Svahn, MD
Vascular Surgery (Venous Disease)
212.420.5648

Vascular Labs
212.844.5555