Here are answers to some of your questions about giant abdominal wall hernia.

What is a giant abdominal wall hernia?

A giant abdominal wall hernia can develop from a long-standing ventral hernia or incisional hernia and often follows multiple failed repair attempts. It is also seen as the result of a traumatic injury that required the abdomen to be left open with delayed healing. This large hernia allows multiple loops of intestines and on occasion, other abdominal organs, to reside within the hernia sac. Over time, as the abdominal wall muscles become used to this, they retract and the available space inside the abdomen decreases.


How will the physician know if I have a giant abdominal wall hernia?

Patients suffering from a giant abdominal wall hernia often complain of unsightly bulging of the abdominal wall. Other symptoms of a giant abdominal wall hernia are chronic, non-healing wounds, immobility and back pain. Physical examination can confirm diagnosis and CT scan or MRI is often used to help assess the extent of the hernia and the contents within the hernia sac.


How can this hernia be treated?

Surgery is required to relieve the complications of a giant abdominal wall hernia. In some cases, a complex form of mesh repair can be performed, although a procedure called components separation is often needed. In many cases, our surgeons opt for a combination of both.


To make an appointment with one of our surgeons at the Beth Israel Hernia Center, please call 212.844.1555, or click here to fill out an appointment scheduling form. Staff will get back to you within
48 hours.

If you have questions about the Hernia Center and our doctors please email them to herniacenterny@chpnet.org.
We are glad to answer your questions but please do not send pictures of your hernia to the center.

For Appointment Call
212.844.1555


Questions
If you have questions
about the Hernia Center
and our doctors please email them to herniacenterny@chpnet.org

We are glad to answer your questions but please do not send pictures of your hernia to the center.